5 Secrets to the Best Runzas You Can Make, no matter where you are

runzas9Everybody’s gotta eat, Gentle Readers, even when you are in a paradisiacal land of plenty like New Zealand, which is where we were most of this past month, by God’s grace and great blessing. That was my explanation for how I found myself making runzas in our host family’s Tauranga kitchen one lovely afternoon. We were all going to be home that evening; I didn’t have access to a car that day; the kids and I had already been to the beach and had our daily ice cream cones; we were all a tad homesick and I wanted to do something nice for the folks who had opened up their home to us for our stay; all those things added up to one thing:

I needed to make runzas.

Runzas, of course, are something I would guess most–if not all–Nebraskans are familiar with. The history of the Runza restaurants that are scattered across several states in the Midwest started in 1949, when Sally Everett and her brother, Alex Brening, opened a small Runza restaurant near Pioneers Park, in Lincoln, Nebraska, to sell their cabbage-and-hamburger-roll sandwiches. They sold the sandwiches there for nearly twenty years, before Sally’s son Donald Everett Sr. bought the franchise and started a Runza Restaurant at another location in Lincoln. The chain has only grown since then, with dozens of locations now throughout Nebraska, and a few in Iowa, Colorado, and Kansas.

When we are not gallivanting about the globe, that is to say when we are home in Nebraska, we crave runzas regularly, and there’s a super-easy fix for this: we can drive 20 miles in three different directions and get to a Runza restaurant and order piping hot runzas and “frings” (a combination of french fries and onion rings) in short order, and my goodness, I am really getting hungry sitting here writing this.

What I suffer through for you, my Gentle Reader. πŸ˜‰ To continue . . . if we don’t feel like eating out, and I have a bit of time on my hands, I make runzas at home. It’s my favorite thing to make to sock into the freezer in freezer bags for easy meals to send with the guys for weekday lunches. I’m not going to lie to you and say that the homemade ones are better than the restaurant ones every time. Some times they lack . . . something. But sometimes they are pretty much just the way you want them to be: steaming hot, oozing with cheese (or no cheese, depending on your cheese preference) and dripping with hamburger, onions, and cabbage.

runzas4The sad and painfully true fact is this: it’s easy to make runzas at home that will elicit the following disappointing word from your family: “Meh.”

It is a worthy challenge, actually, to make the sort of runzas that make your family do cartwheels and ask for seconds. Or thirds. Or cause them to look you directly in the face and utter the words you really want to hear:

“You are the most amazing person on the face of the earth, bar none. And this runza just made my day better.

You know you want to hear those words. I certainly live for them, myself. πŸ™‚ No kidding.

I’ve made runzas enough times in my many decades (cough) of daily cooking and baking, to have amassed a few secrets to the really greatΒ runzas that you can make at home, rather than the mediocre ones that it’s painfully easy to come up with.

runzas3And I’m going to share those secrets with you. Consider this post your very own personal shortcut, Gentle Reader, to delicious homemade runzas at your house. And you’re welcome, I’m sure. πŸ™‚ And if you share this post with your friends? Gravy, baby, gravy. They’ll love you even more than they do right now, I’m sure of it. And who couldn’t use more love in their lives? (I couldn’t possibly love you more, but my fond regard for you would be even more ardent.)

But first, I’ll post the recipe that I’ve developed over time. This recipe is a culmination of many, many runza-making sessions, not only in my own kitchen, but in my mother’s, as well. We’ve tried to break the Runza Code, together, Mom and me. So some of these secrets are from her kitchen, as well. I also gained a tip or two from this website, so a hat tip for this blogger, also a Nebraska grandma who shared her insights on Runza-making. Nebraska grandmas unite!

runzas8Okay, let’s get on to the recipe, and then I’ll share my runza-related secrets, and then we’ll all have a party in my honor. Not really. Well, why not? I’ll bring the bubbly. πŸ™‚

4.7 from 10 reviews
5 Secrets to the Best Runzas You Can Make, no matter where
Author: 
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 20
 
It's not difficult to make a decent batch of runzas, but it's doggone tricky to make a FANTASTIC batch of runzas. This recipe has the secrets to superlative runzas, those iconic cabbage and hamburger baked sandwiches that you can find in Nebraska and just about nowhere else.
Ingredients
  • Filling ingredients:
  • 2 cups chopped onions
  • 2 garlic cloves, smashed and diced
  • 2 pounds ground beef
  • 1 large head of cabbage, shredded
  • 1 small can saurkraut, with the juice
  • salt and pepper to taste (more than you think!)
  • (optional) cheese of your choice (also more than you think!)
  • Dough ingredients:
  • 1 cup butter, unsalted
  • 2 scant Tb of dry yeast
  • 4 cups warm water (or warmed milk)
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 2 Tbs salt
  • 4 well-beaten eggs
  • 15-16 cups flour (14 cups unbleached, 2 cups whole wheat)
Instructions
  1. First, make the filling:
  2. Chop onions and garlic and sautΓ© in a large frying pan with a little butter or olive oil until tender. Add ground beef along with generous amounts of salt and pepper. Cook through and drain well.
  3. Put browned ground beef into a large pot (I like to use my crockpot). Stir in cabbage and kraut.
  4. Simmer 3-4 hours, stirring often, and seasoning and tasting. πŸ™‚
  5. (If using a crockpot, cook on "low" for 5 to 6 hours.)
  6. For the dough:
  7. Stir the yeast into the warm water.
  8. Add the shortening to the water to soften, too.
  9. In a large bowl, mix together sugar, salt, and eggs.
  10. Stir in yeast mixture.
  11. Add flour one cup at a time, stirring well after each cup.
  12. When the dough becomes too stiff to stir, turn out onto the counter and incorporate remaining flour by kneading.
  13. Knead 100 strokes until the dough is elastic and smooth. Let rest in a covered bowl one hour or until doubled in size.
  14. Cut off golf ball sized pieces to roll out and fill.
  15. Follow instructions below for rolling and filling.
  16. Preheat oven to 375 while letting filled runzas rest for 30 minutes.
  17. Bake for approximately 30 minutes, until approaching golden. Swash with melted butter and bake for 10 more minutes.
  18. Serve while hot. Urge caution! The filling will be very hot! Enjoy!

Oh, a note on the recipe above: the dough recipe is double what you need for the filling, because I figure a double batch is no more trouble than a single batch, and then the leftover I make into cinnamon rolls the next morning, or dinner rolls the next night. Clever, eh? And it’s lovely to have dough sitting in the ‘fridge waiting for you to use it up. πŸ™‚ If you don’t feel up to such cleverness, cut the dough ingredients down by half, to match the amount of filling.

runzas2Secret #1:

This one I learned from my afternoon of making runzas in New Zealand. After you brown your hamburger with chopped onions and cabbage, dump it all into a big crockpot and let it cook (on low) all afternoon. Trust me. It makes the filling so oozy-tasty-delectable. You don’t want the cabbage to be crunchy at all,Β  and this long, slow cooking does the trick to render it all sloppy and soft, like you want it.

Secret #2

Over-season the meat mixture. Salt and pepper it just a tad more than you regularly would. Season it, then taste. Taste and season. Over and over again until you think “Hmm. That’s just a little too peppery,” and then you know that it’s perfect. The bread part of the runza will temper that overseasoning. Be more careful with the salt than the pepper, WTTW.

Secret #3

runzas5

My mom taught me this secret for runza forming. (Thanks, Mom!) First, roll out a circle of dough approximately 1/4″ thick. It shouldn’t be so thin that it is breaking up into holes when you handle it. Then place it into a bowl. Dump your filling on top of the dough, and then pull the dough around the filling and pinch and pinch and so forth until it looks like this:

runzas6

Flip it over and it’ll look like this: Pretty, huh?

runzas7

(Yep, in New Zealand, I cooked barefoot. Everybody does nearly everything barefoot over there. I love it.)

Secret #4:

A cup or two of whole wheat flour added to the dough recipe makes a prettier runza dough. And, finally:

Secret #5:

Slathering melted butter all over the top during the last ten minutes of baking increases the prettiness, too. And that buttery taste on the hot bread: who doesn’t love that? Nobody, that’s who. πŸ™‚

And we like pretty, don’t we, you and I? Not to mention pretty and buttery. Yum.

runza

See the darker flecks? That’s whole wheat flour. And the browning is so pretty, because of the butter.

That’s it, Gentle Reader! If it seems like a complicated recipe, it actually isn’t–and if you don’t have time in one day to make all of it, you can make the filling and dough one day, and then put them all together and bake them the next.

Just a tip. Word to the wise. And whatnot.

Now go. Make runzas. Conquer your fears. And eat well. The world is counting on you, to make a difference.

I know you can do it.

πŸ™‚

*hugs*

By the by . . . have you got an Amazon list? I nearly always do! I live a good hour away from most stores, so ordering from Amazon has been a huge and convenient (sometimes too convenient) blessing for me. If you click through from my links to Amazon, they’ll give me a teensy commission on anything you purchase (though it won’t cost you another cent!) and I’ll love ya forever! * and thanks!* It’s a win/win!

Β 

61 thoughts on “5 Secrets to the Best Runzas You Can Make, no matter where you are

  1. Jillian

    I’ll have to add this to my bucket list! Never had one before but it sounds great! The cheese goes in the filling right?

    Have you ever had a pasty?

    1. gene gage

      Jillian – I’m now a Nebraskan, neighbor of Amy and lifelong runza-eater, but I’ve lived in several parts of the US and in two countries in Europe. (Runza is actually a trademarked product name, and Amy would get sued if she tried to sell her delicacies by that name to the public.) Runzas, pasties and pirogs are all part of our food heritage from Central & Eastern Europe. Different sizes, shapes and fillings, but basically the same thought – a really yummy dough stuffed with some kind of filling and baked. It’s getting the dough just right that is the tricky part. My German-Russian mother just called them cabbage rolls. In Sweden, a nearly identical thing is called a pirog.

      Just recently, one of my Nebraska friends originally from Seattle introduced me to what she calls “sausage rolls,” which look exactly like runzas when they come out of the oven, but the filling is very much Italian – spicy sausage, vaguely tomato sauce and lots of herbs and cheese. And just as tasty as runzas.

    2. dramamamafive Post author

      Sorry Jillian, I left that part out: yes, you’d put the cheese on the dough circle before the filling. As Gene pointed out in the comments, you can alter the fillings to accommodate your tastes/ moods: we’ve made runzas before with sliced green peppers, mushrooms and Swiss cheese, Italian seasonings, etc. Basically any meat/veg combination you really like can be folded into a good dough and baked. This could be a very tasty series: “What I baked into dough for tonight’s supper.” Thanks for the idea, Jillian!

  2. Joyce

    A question, oh wise one of all things yeast, chickens, and gardening: I was surprised to read about keeping the dough in the fridge for the next day. I’m guessing this is after the dough rises, correct? Do you ‘punch’ the dough, cover, and place in the fridge? When you work the dough the next day, do you bring it to room temp, do whatever shape you want, let rise, etc?

    Thanks!

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Joyce, allow me to reveal the Secret of Dough Refrigeration. Nearly any yeast dough can be refrigerated at any time—even frozen!–you just have to allow it a few hours to warm up again, afterwards, before you work with it. Unrefrigerated dough will stretch and accept shaping much easier than cold dough. I would cover it (a lid or plastic wrap) and put it into the ‘fridge whenever I needed to—after the raise/punch, or before it. It’ll keep for several days, even a week or two. If you freeze dough, then it would need a good overnight thawing before you can work with it. I think I’d probably let refrigerated dough sit out at room temp for 3 or 4 hours before trying to work with it, frozen dough 8 hours. I’m guessing here: I’ll pay more attention next time I do this to see how long it takes! πŸ™‚ Good luck! OH, and to answer your other question: yes, I’d let the refrig’d dough warm up, then shape it, then let it rise. Then bake. Then . . . . pull out the butter and eat, baby. πŸ™‚

  3. Nathana Clay

    I do miss Runza! I always have to eat there when back in Nebraska. Last fall I found a great recipe and made them at home, freezing most of them. They turned out delicious! But I didn’t write down the recipe and may not be able to find it again. So, I will try your recipe! It sounds a bit healthier anyways. And, I love the tip of filling it in a bowl–genius! The only downside to making Runzas is that my husband is not a fan of them . . . But, I have no problem making them and freezing them and eating them when he is at work, or sharing them with friends.

  4. M.

    Amy! This is sooooo funny, as in odd, but amusing. I wanted to thank you for your Nine Grain Bread recipe. I used your Nine Grain Mix in my daily wheat bread recipe, baking two loaves of bread, a tiny “roll” loaf (baked in ramekins–too cute!), and 15 “cabbage burgers”. In the past, my family has enjoyed this mea. With the addition of your Nine Grain Mix (you haven’t TRADEMARKED that, have you? ;)), my family insists all future cabbage burgers be made with that particular grain mix. So thank you very much for the Nine Grain Mix recipe and this post. Time to make dinner!

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Wow, do you know that I totally forgot that I wrote about my Nine Grain Mix? It is so versatile, isn’t it? I add it to oatmeal, too, to provide more of a nutritional punch, and it would be good in the runza dough, too. Thanks for making my day! πŸ™‚

  5. Linda

    When you freeze Runzs do you let them rise after filling, before you freeze? Or do you Freeze them as soon as you fill them? Then let them thaw and rise before baking?

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Linda,
      I flash-freeze them–I stick them right into the freezer on cookie sheets, then once they are frozen solid, I transfer them into double-freezer bags—as soon as they are filled. Letting them rise first would just result in their falling once you stick them into the freezer.

  6. Barbara Donovan

    #8 for dough says to add shortening to water to soften. I do not see shortening on the list of ingredients. Assuming I am to use butter in place of shortening, what is the amount?
    I just returned from NE (nary a Runza in Ohio) and can hardly wait to try this recipe! You wouldn’t happen to have a recipe for a proper Czech kolache, eh?

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Dear Barbara! The butter is the shortening (my mom calls nearly every type of fat “shortening” and I follow her lead, natch’!) and I think there is 1 cup of unsalted butter listed.
      A recipe for a proper Czech kolache! That’s an awesome idea. I’ll get right on it. I do know some old Czech folks who make them, so I’m going to get the recipe and play around with it. I’ll post it if it turns out FABULOUS. Where in Ohio do you live? My kids just moved back from Ohio (Akron) to Nebraska. Good luck with the recipe!!

  7. Linda Bales

    I am impressed with your recipe. It is similar to my own. However….I mix 2 Tbsp. of AuJus gravy mix into cabbage groundbeef mix. Just a little more beefy flavor. Another trick I have used in the past is to use string cheese with the filling. It seems to hold a little better. And I mix a little mayo with grated Swiss cheese for Swiss mushroom Runza. Mmmm good.

  8. Steve Peters

    My family lived at 815 F Street in Lincoln. The German Russian community surrounded us. They were very protective of their recipes. But my mothers best friend shared many recipes and technics. Many around us preferred to use sauerkraut that they made from cabbage in their perfect pristine gardens. Those gardens were amazing. My grandfather in Bosworth Mo had a similar kraut recipe. Thats what gave that special flavor to the kraut runza. The other seret is lots of salty butter and served hot. We moved to central il and when my daughter was little we had a great baby sitter and our daughter would stay with her over night. One day we,went to pick our daughter up and I walked into the house and smelled a familiar smell. I asked what she was making and she said Kraut Runzas. Turns out she grew up close to where I lived. Kraut Runzas are special to my family. Comfort food.

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Steve,
      I love it how stories–in particular, stories about food–can create such strong memories and relationships. I love your story so much–what are the odds that you’d hire a babysitter who made the same type of Runzas that you grew up eating? My kiddos used to be in choirs in Lincoln that met at a church in the German Russian part of town. While the older kiddos were in choir, I used to take the younger kids on walks around that beautiful neighborhood. There’s a museum down there with bricks on the walk in front of it with names engraved of many of those immigrants. My daughter Amalia–just a little girl at the time–was delighted to find a couple of “Amalia”s on the walk. Thank you so much for sharing your story with me–and I concur with the lots of salty butter and served hot!!

  9. Rhian

    Oh Miss Amy… You have been such wonderful blessing to me πŸ™‚ – My FiancΓ© is from Lincoln Nebraska and has spoken on Runzas – A LOT. He has missed them and every week while watching the Huskers play, he gives a little sigh and wants a hot gooey Runza mess. I have been wanting to cook some for him, but have been terrified of not holding my own against the pros he won’t shut up about. A disappointing Runza would be worse than not having one at all (or at least that’s how I’ve read into it) …. I did 2 practice rounds without him knowing, just to see and WOW! The sad thing is I’ve never had one, so I have nothing to compare it to, but DANG they are good. So I made him some and now he really won’t shut up about them πŸ™‚ THANK YOU SO MUCH !! (from both of us)
    -Rhian

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Rhian, your comment is a real blessing to me! Thank you so much. I have made plenty of disappointing runzas in my life, ergo why I wrote that post when I discovered how to make really terrific ones!! Good on you for working so hard to make something to please your husband. You are certainly a sweet wife. Keep in touch, okay?

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Laura, the easiest way would be to cover them (I usually use waxed paper) and microwave for a minute or two. BUT you can also cover them (this time with foil) and heat gently in the oven (300 degrees, maybe?) for 15 minutes or until steaming hot. I hope they turn out well!

  10. Todd

    Is there liquid in the crock pot after cooking? Do you drain the meat mixture prior to filling the dough? Thanks, this recipe sounds great. I’m from Hastings, Nebraska, but live in Ohio now, and I do miss the Runza.

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Todd,
      It depends on how long you let it cook, and how much moisture there is in the cabbage. In my experience, there is always some cabbage/meat juices in the crockpot, because of the slow cooking and the fact that you keep the lid on the crock-pot. I didn’t drain the meat mixture, though, I just used a slotted spoon when handling the filling, and that drained it pretty easily and naturally. Good luck!

  11. Kim Rose

    I just recently had to make a ‘hot’ meal for my daughter’s basketball team (parents take turns feeding girls on away games and girls were tired of sandwiches). My daughter asked me to make Runza for them. When I cook I usually cook for an army, and following recipes is for some reason I am more of a ‘dump and hope’ kinda cook. I managed to make Runza for girls (although my dump & hope Runza were a hit, I altered and used more of a pizza dough recipe). Long story short, because everyone loved the Runza I made, I have been asked to make up Runza’s for the concession stand at the school for a home game, due to requests for them and no one had the time or desire to make them, so here I am. A question that I have due to the fact that for concession stand Runza basically needs to be ready to serve. How well would the Runza’s hold up if I was to make them, bake them, and wrap them and then freeze them? Also how long would they last in freezer, just in case they are a hit and I need to make ahead.

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Bless your heart, Kim! What a lot of work that would be, and I’m pretty sure they will be a hit. You asked a great question. If I were doing it, I would slightly underbake the runzas, wrap them well and freeze them. Then pull them out and put them on cookie sheets or jelly roll pans, and bake them. Probably brushing melted butter on them would be a good idea, too. Of course brushing melted butter on nearly anything, imho, usually isn’t a bad idea. πŸ˜‰ And if you had them well wrapped in freezer bags, I would guess that they would last for a couple months at least. Good luck. I’d love to hear back from you about how all this goes!

  12. Sue Bollwitt

    I am considering making lots of runs for family from out-of-state. I have made, baked and frozen runzas for myself, but this will be the first experience for many and I want to have them made and ready to pop in the oven. Would it be best to undertake, freeze, then thaw and finish baking them OR freeze them without any baking and bake them from frozen in a 375 degree oven?

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Sue,
      Either way would work, I’m sure, but if it were me, I’d probably freeze them without baking and bake them as you said, brushing butter on them during that last few minutes. I think they would probably taste fresher that way.

  13. Carole Budd

    I love making Runza….I aquire the recipe from a young lady that lived next door. Her recipe calls for a sponge dough that is out of this world. Before baking I brush milk on the tops and in the oven they go. I have used this recipe for 40 plus years. They freeze great and always go fast.

      1. Carole Budd

        My recipe for sponge dough. 1 pkg. Dry yeast dissolved in 1/4 c. warm water plus 1 T. sugar. Mix 1 T. Crisco shortening, 1/2 t. salt into 3/4 c.warm milk. After yeast has done it’s thing which should be right about now mix it with the milk liquid you just made. Add 2 c. flour to yeast. Beat well. Turn out on a floured board and knead until elastic. One hint I use is do it all in a food processer…saves time but don’t over process. Place dough in greased bowl and cover with damp cloth. Let rise in warm place until double.

  14. Kay

    Ironically, I made runzas, one year after you posted this, almost to the day and as I was perusing Pinterest, I found your recipe. I use a different recipe for the dough. Basically a sweeter bread dough (no eggs or milk) that starts with a slurry. The filling is ground beef, onion, cabbage, Worcestershire sauce, Seasoned salt, pepper and oregano. As for freezing; I bake and flash freeze and vacuum-seal for longer storage. And Yes! Butter on top after baking. You must! πŸ™‚ I appreciate your mom’s secret to filling them. I make a long cylinder of the dough, cut in thirds and then into fifths. I lay the slice on it’s cut side and then roll. It seems to work better that way and doesn’t fight the rolling pin as much. Spoon on the filling and pinch to seal. Let the first pan rise while preparing the second (I do 6 to a pan.) Then bake at 375 for 20 mins. The original recipe is here: http://acceptingecho.blogspot.com/2012/06/homemade-runza-recipe-and-pictures.html?m=1

  15. Amy Loock

    Two words. Egg bath. Whip up an egg and brush it over each runza before baking. It gives them the perfect finish without having to add the wheat flour.

  16. Lori Shaulis

    I really do not care for sauerkraut….if I skip that ingredient maybe add more cabbage, will it adversely effect the finished product?? Or can’t you taste the sauerkraut once cooked?

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Go ahead and leave out the sauerkraut, Lori. Just add more cabbage (quite a bit more, as it will cook down) and a couple pinches more salt and pepper. Probably you won’t even notice the difference! Good luck and let me know how they turn out!

  17. Chas

    AFter being raised in England until the age of 16 I never heard of a Runza…but upon moving to the US in the state of Nebraska Lincoln to be exactI was introduced to them when I passed A Runza resteraunt and stopped in to see what it was…..OMG!!! I was hooked….I would go there almost every day for lunch…..I joined the Military and left Nebraska so the only time i could get runzas was when i was home on leave…..THANKS for this recipe they taste JUST like they did back in 78-79 DELICIOUS

  18. Ron Stoehr

    I’m 72-year-old German Russian born and raised in The German Bottoms. My gramma lived directly across the street (7th and C street) she had 10 children so no matter where they lived they would always come home to mommas for the holidays. My gramma was the best runza maker in the world, along with everything else German goodies. She taught me and everyone else how to make runza,I now live in Hopkins Village, Belize I’ve been baking cinnamon rolls and selling them on the street 2 dozen at a time for 7 years. I usually don’t have to go more than a few blocks and their gone. Now you’ve helped me to start making runzas as well.

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Wonderful, Ron! I’d love to see a picture of you selling those Runzas, to publish on my blog! Would you be able to send me one?

  19. Peggy Z

    A friend emailed us your post on runzas. I can’t wait to try this recipe, so sauerkraut is on my shopping list for tomorrow. We live in southwest Kansas and the Mennonite community here makes thes for community suppers but they are called bierocks. My Mother made them and called them cabbage rolls. They were served with yellow mustard as a dipping sauce.

  20. Rose Ann Geib

    Hi!
    I live near where your children lived, in Canton, Ohio. I can say for sure I had never heard of a Runza until this morning, in a feature about an upcoming food festival in St. Louis. I am very impressed that this thread of comments began in March, 2016 and continues today. Shows me this is truly a very good recipe! I cannot wait to make this this weekend. It is just starting to cool off here in Ohio and these cute little concoctions scream fall to me. Did you ever make those Czech kolache? I have great respect for ethnic food (being from Hungarian decent) and love trying new things. Thank you for answering every question above and making me stretch my cooking wings just a little further (like say, Nebraska?)

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Rose Ann, thank you for your nice comments. I do believe this is a great recipe. And I’ve been working on runza recipes for DECADES, honestly. I’m happy that Runzas have made it to Ohio! I’ve never come up with a recipe for kolaches that I really liked. Do you make them? I’d love to keep experimenting with my recipe, if you have any insights??

  21. Carol Drake

    I was introduced to Runzas over 30 yrs. ago, in Nebraska and I now live in California. I found a recipe and tried making them. You were right, they can be very blah if not made right. No flavor at all. I was so disappointed. I just found your recipe today and you can be sure I will try it. I’m not a sauerkraut lover either, but I want the flavor. Maybe I will try just a small can. Thank you so much for posting your recipe. I can’t rate your recipe right now, but I will return.

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Carol, honestly, you can use cabbage OR sauerkraut, or both, it doesn’t seem to make that much difference. Just make sure to season the meat mixture well, otherwise it will be very bland and a huge disappointment.

  22. Chef Heather Mader

    So many comments I don’t know what to add..but growing up in the midwest this was a family staple recipe for us. So nice to be able to find this recipe and get the same results as when I was a kid. πŸ™‚

    Thank you for sharing -and all the tips are wonderful!

  23. Dan Overton

    Hey, Amy. I’m really stoked about your recipe. I like the sauerkraut addition and the notion of slow cooking the meat mixture in a crockpot (or on the stove top, at low heat, as I do with my pizza sauce). My question is: how much does the whole wheat flour add to the dough? I do almost all of my baking with unbleached white.

    Thanks for the recipe and Go Big Red! (especially the women’s volley-ballers).

    1. dramamamafive Post author

      Dan, Yes, those lady Husker volleyballers are something else, aren’t they??

      Okay, truth is, taste-wise the whole wheat flour doesn’t do a lot, especially since I don’t add that much in the first place. So if you want to leave it out, please do! But it does make a very pretty dough, in my humblest opinion, to have the flecks of bran from the whole wheat flour. It’s totally up to you, though! When I made that recipe in the blog post, I was in New Zealand, so my choices were limited. Here at home, I’d use some of the white wheat flour that I use for our bread. It is a whiter (obs) wheat and grinds up finer, and it doesn’t add any heaviness.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Anti-Spam Quiz:

Rate this recipe: